Evaluating your FRC Supplier During the COVID-19 Crisis – Supply Chain

Welcome back to our continuing blog series, FRC Suppliers During the COVID-19 Crisis providing resources critical to evaluating your FRC supplier, helping to ensure you have access to the services and products necessary to function safely and efficiently during a crisis.

Breakdowns in supply chains can have a critical impact on your operational capacity. Almost every product we purchase comes to us through a supply chain supported by multiple vendors. If one of these businesses has an issue during a crisis, the entire supply chain can be affected, and products can be severely delayed – or never come at all.

COVID-19 has caused major strains in global supply chains. We have seen runs on hand sanitizer, PPE, and even toilet paper. When this happens, delays can be days, weeks, or even months. Can your company survive a delay of this magnitude if your FRC supplier has an issue within its supply chain?

Join Tyndale’s Vice President of Technical, Scott Margolin as he explains what we should know about FRC supplier supply chain implications during times of crisis:

Evaluating Supply Chains to Avoid Problems

There are several questions to ask your supplier to avoid delays or reductions in goods and services.

1) Has your supplier invested in on-hand inventory?

This question is important to gauge the well-being of your supplier. If the answer is yes – your suppliers invests in inventory, that’s not enough. How much has your supplier has invested in inventory? If they have invested in significant quantities, then delays in delivery of products or services during a crisis should be minimal. If no, and your supplier relies on “just in time” inventory – popular before COVID-19 – this could spell disaster as this crisis drags on. You might begin to notice delays, reductions in service, and run the risk of not getting your FRC/PPE at all.

2) With a major global supply chain crunch, how much made in the USA FRC and PPE is available?

Made in the USA products offer reduced risks vs. imported products during the global supply chain “crunch” caused by COVID-19. If your supplier offers a large selection of made in the USA products, supply chain issues can be lessened in times of crisis. Inventory can be more readily replaced with a quicker turnaround time, with more certainty that factories are operating.

3) Where does your supplier fit within the supply chain?

The largest companies with the largest spend are first in line for access when inventory is tight or items go out of stock and they need to replenish inventory. How does that impact you? If you’re buying from a small supplier, you could be putting your workers at risk if you can’t get FRC.

4) Does your supplier have multiple warehouses for inventory?

Does your supplier have more than one warehouse? And are those warehouses in geographically diverse locations across the US? If COVID-19 were to hit your supplier’s warehouse with significant numbers of employees impacted, the warehouse might shut down. Having a provider with multiple warehouses in different geographic locations can mitigate issues should a warehouse location be incapacitated due to COVID-19.

Have serious concerns about your FRC supplier’s ability to keep a functioning supply chain during a crisis like COVID-19? Reach out to a National Account Executive serving your area to discuss and explore options available to meet service needs.

COVID-19 has dramatically affected global supply chains which can impact your company’s ability to get the FRC needed to function safely and efficiently. Make sure your FRC supplier is well positioned, with a strong supply chain and can provide FRC without interruption. Follow along with our last post in our series to find out how to evaluate your supplier’s quality of service in times of crisis.

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