Protective Footwear FAQs

1Are Tyndale’s boots Electric Hazard (EH) Rated?

Tyndale sells both EH and non-EH rated boots. All safety-toe boots that Tyndale sells meet the requirements of ASTM F2413, the specification for performance requirements for protective footwear. ASTM 2413 requires protective footwear to meet impact and compression-resistance tests, but an EH rating is not necessary for compliance to the standard. Because many utility companies require boots to be EH rated in addition to compliant with ASTM 2413, it is important to carefully read the product descriptions that accompany each item in your catalog.

2How is a boot EH rated?

A boot is filled with steel BBs, and placed on a steel plate. A positive electric wire is placed in the BBs, and a negative is connected to the steel plate. The test measures how much current can travel through the sole of the boot. EH rated boots have been tested and found to offer sufficient resistance to electric currents up to 600 volts.

3What about ANSI Z41 PT99 – isn’t that the standard for protective footwear?

The American National Standard’s Institute Z41 Committee on Personal Protection – Protective Footwear has merged into ASTM International’s Committee F13. With this merger, F13 oversaw the redrafting of ANSI Z41 performance requirements and test method standards for protective footwear. The ANSI Z41 standard has been withdrawn and the ASTM standards – F2412-05 and F2413-05 now provide the industry standard for protective footwear. The ASTM standards incorporate nearly all the information from the old ANSI Standard, as well as expand on testing methods.

4What are the differences between the old ANSI Z41 PT99 boot standard and the new ASTM F2412-11 boot standard?

ANSI Z41 PT99 and ASTM F2412-11 are similar in nearly every aspect, with two major differences. First, ANSI Z41 divides static dissipative boots into Type 1 (lower resistance limit of no more than 10.8 ohms) and Type 2 (lower resistance limit of no more than 10.9 ohms), while the ASTM standard eliminates “types” and instead specifies that footwear must have an electrical resistance with a lower limit of 10.6 ohms and an upper limit of 10.8 ohms. Second, the ANSI standard gives compression resistance ratings of 75, 50, and 30, which correlate to 2500 pounds, 1750 pounds, and 1000 pounds of compression. The ASTM standard eliminates the two lowest compression categories—Class 30 (1000 pounds) and Class 50 (1750 pounds)—meaning all compliant footwear must be Class 75.

5What protection do steel toe boots provide to the wearer?

Steel toe boots provide a steel protective covering over the toe, which protects the wearer from injury - meeting ASTM standard F2412-11 for impact and compression resistance. Steel toes are generally required by most industries, but are uncomfortable for people who walk long distances (like meter readers) and difficult for those who go through metal detectors in the course of their daily work (like nuclear workers). These workers might instead use composite toe boots, which are non-metal plates protecting the foot. Tyndale offers many boots with protective toe coverings, both steel and composite.

6What type of work is a composite toe boot best suited for?

A composite toe boot features a non-metallic, non-magnetic protective covering over the toe, which resists corrosion and serves the same function as the steel toe without setting off metal detectors. Composite toe boots are well suited for workers who must go through metal detectors at work or workers exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Composite toe boots are tested to the same ASTM standard F2412-11 for impact and compression as steel toe boots, and offer the equal protection to the worker.

7What is a steel shank and when is it used?

A steel shank is a metal plate in the sole of a boot that makes it more comfortable for a worker to stand for a long time on a narrow peg. It provides extra support for the foot, and is beneficial when climbing utility poles.

8What is a composite shank?

A composite shank is a non-metal plate in the sole of the boot, serving the same function as a steel shank.

9What about boot height – are there specific requirements?

Boot height is measured as the height that the boot goes up the wearer's leg. Most utility work requires a minimum boot height of 6". Tyndale sells boots with 6”, 8”, 10”, and 12” heights.

10What's the difference between insulated and waterproof boots?

Insulated boots are lightweight and quick-drying, with moisture resistant insulation that helps to keep feet warm. Waterproof boots offer seam-sealed construction and waterproof leather, and help to keep feet dry in wet environments.

11How do I know which overshoe sizes to order?

If you typically order a size 9 shoe, order a size 9 overshoes. Overshoes are meant to fit over the size shoe you usually wear.

12How are boot widths measured? How do I know which boots I need to buy?

If you typically require a "wide width" shoe, you will also need a "wide width" boot. Boots typically come in Medium (M) and Wide (W or EE). Most manufacturers refer to wide boots as W; Carhartt refers to wide boots as EE.

13Does Tyndale offer women's sized boots?

Yes, Tyndale offers women's boots with protective toes and recommends purchasing these instead of men's boots when a protective toe is needed.

14I am a woman and am thinking about purchasing a men's sized boot. How should I proceed?

Tyndale does not recommend that women purchase men's sized boots when a protective toe is needed. If you are ordering boots without protective toes, you may consider ordering men's boots for more options. Typically, you would need to order one-and-a-half (1-1/2) to two (2) sizes smaller than your usual size, depending on the manufacturer. For example, if you are usually a size 8 in women's shoes, you would need to order a men's size 6 or 6-1/2. If you have any questions about boot sizing, please call Tyndale Customer Service at 800-356-3433.